Unlikely Encounter

 

Rencontre improbable

Unlikely Encounter

The famous play “Rhinoceros” by Eugene Ionesco is a satire of certain human behaviors to the emergence of an ideology, more specifically cowardice of most French under occupation during the Second World War. It describes how a minority but violent phenomenon causes unbelief of the people who first reject it. It shows that this rejection was quickly followed by a general indifference when the phenomenon is growing. Individuals, society at large, are actually quite easy accustomed to what they were theoretically opposed. Passivity and renunciation of the people before totalitarian regimes seems to be a rule that defies ages and borders.

Franck Pavloff did not talk about anything else in his short story “brown Morning” (1998), an anti-fascist metaphor against the single thought that describes how freedom can be removed surreptitiously, without anyone ever being revolted. This is also what Mathieu Kassovitz denounces in his film “La Haine” released in 1995. A character tells the story of a guy falling off a building and said to each floor, “So far so good!”

The allegory of the frog is a small fable that perfectly illustrates this human behavior: Imagine a pot of cold water in which a frog swimming quietly. You light a fire under the pot. When the water is warm, the frog is delighted and continuous swimming. The temperature continues to rise and the water gets hot, not too hot but just enough to the languish frog that continues to swim in its pot. Even the water became too hot for the little animal is not enough to make it react and it happened what should happen: The frog eventually die without escaping … This is sad, especially if you know that a frog immersed directly in too hot water would immediately jump out of the pot…

So wake up, be indignant, as said Stéphane Hessel, Step outside your slumber and start finally to ask the good questions … And above all, re-learn to move you by the beauty of the world.

 

 

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